5 Simple Ways to Make Joints Burn Slower and Last Longer

Joints burn slower and last longer

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Let your joints burn slow

Controlling joint burn speed for maximized enjoyment

If everyone who consumed cannabis also grew it, marijuana would cost mere pennies. Not everyone has a green thumb, however. For many who don’t and rely entirely on someone else to produce their cannabis, it’s a considerable expense. So we will help you with ways to make your joints burn slower and last longer. 

Instead of cutting back on how much is consumed, it can be easier to find ways to extend the life of a stash. One way to do that is to use smoking tactics that make joints burn slower and last longer. Every joint has an inherent smokeable time. How long that time goes depends on several factors. Everyone knows thickness, length, bud type, and where the bud is in the curing process.

Those aren’t the only ways to determine how long a joint will smoke. Here are five ways to make joints burn slower and last longer.

  1. Smoke the Entire Joint
  • If the goal is to extend the life of the joint, it’s an obvious point when stated so bluntly: smoke the entire joint. The backend of the joint is often overlooked, understated, or underutilized. Two ways when smoking a joint that can extend it’s smokeable time.

The first idea is to avoid using filters when smoking a joint. Filters significantly reduce the size of a joint. A ¼” filter on a 1 ¼” joint cuts its potential size down by 20%. That means smokeable time is significantly reduced.

The second: smoke the roach. The wasteful throw the end of the bud out the window. The frugal save them in an Altoids can for times of drought. The wise know they should pinch their roach in a roach clip and consume it immediately. A roach on a roach clip slows down its burn speed. The roach builds up that gooey resin as the joint is burned. Its molasses-like accumulation in the roach slows the fire and strengthens the hit.

As the roach dwindles, a smooth stream of smoke can be carefully inhaled through the nose until the joint is completely gone. When it’s gone, so is the evidence. Except for that smell.

  1. Be Aware of Your Environment
  • The environment is key to the speed of the burn and smokeable time. Let’s begin with an extreme example: imagine smoking a joint in a rainstorm. Smokeable time would be quite low due to the rain soaking your joint.  

A windy environment makes it difficult to light a joint. Once it’s lit, the wind delivers fresh oxygen into the joint. The speed of combustion increases while the smokeable time decreases.

When smoking a joint, the ideal situation is indoors; ventilation is controlled, and moisture levels are optimal.

If the situation calls for an outdoor smoke session, then it’s best to smoke in a wind-protected area. Try squatting next to a car, penciling up behind a tree, or going horizontal behind some short bushes.

  1. Light it Like a Pro
  • It’s not a cigar; a torch is unnecessary. Zippos are stylish but equally cumbersome. Wood matches are cool, but lighters are much more functional. There’s more than one way to light a joint.

The source of the fire isn’t as important as how the cherry is lit. A huge draw on the first light ignites a hot ember that quickly burns up the first ¼ of the joint.

To get a slow-moving, glowing cherry that burns evenly and slowly, the best way to light a joint is by placing its tip in the flame. Rolling the joint’s tip slowly over the flame creates an even cherry.

Once the cherry is lit, a smooth, slow draw will ensure a good start to a slow burn.

  1. Soft Draws, Not Big Hits
  • Inhaling smoke requires a simple finesse and understanding of fundamental physics. First, the quicker oxygen is drawn into a joint, the hotter it burns. So, hit joints softly.

There’s no race, and no need to smoke the joint as fast as possible. If groups are mindful, everyone will get their fair share, and at a supply, everyone appreciates.

The effortless finesse required is all about controlling one’s diaphragm and lips. A perfect hit is one supple-lipped, smooth draw with the diaphragm. For style points, experts use the last part of the draw to fill their mouth with smoke; they create clouds, circles, and other amusing smoke tricks.

  1. The Right Rolling Paper
  • When it comes to composition, there are three main styles of rolling paper: wood pulp, hemp, and rice papers.

Wood pulp papers are easy to roll with and quite strong, so they don’t easily tear. Their versatility and ease-of-use come at a cost, however. The wood pulp paper tends to burn quicker than hemp or rice.

Most people should roll their joints with a hemp paper. They’re an intermediate style paper that doesn’t burn quickly but is still relatively easy to roll with. Hemp papers are good for people who know how to roll a joint properly and are looking for an even, smooth burn.

Rice papers are thin. They allow for a super clean, slow-moving cherry. Their thinness, however, makes them easy to tear and more difficult to roll with. Rice papers are reserved for the most-practiced rollers who want the slowest burn and the highest smokeable time.

Conclusion to Make Joints Burn Slower and Last Longer

Smoking joints is a relaxing way to consume cannabis. There’s little effort needed, and the abundance of smoke relaxes the mind and creates a calming aura. People are always looking for ways to extend that experience.

Experimentations in climate and setting have shown that windproofing your joint makes it last longer. Specific papers and lighting styles have suggested different ways to make a joint burn slower. Diaphragmatic control helps many slow the burn of the joint and increase its smokeable time.

People have shown mixed results covering their joints in wax or honey. Others swear by twaxxing, creating spirals or lines to slow the burn. Some methods are easier than others.

The five ways to make your joint burn slower and last longer above are something everyone can do to increase the smokeable time of their joints.  

What secret tricks do you know to help your joint burn slower and last longer?